Our Mission

FCC News Brief - September 28, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 5 hours ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

September 28, 2016




Craig Pittman reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “The recovery well is what Mosaic drilled near the hole to try to retrieve the hundreds of millions of gallons of contaminated water that poured into the earth when the sinkhole opened. And the deeper the sinkhole goes, the more serious the threat to the aquifer, which supplies much of Florida’s drinking water…Mosaic officials…said they don’t yet know how deep the hole is…If the contaminated water were to reach one of the aquifer’s underground streams,…it would spread much more quickly and could then become unrecoverable…Mosaic will keep its recovery well pumping water back up from the aquifer as long as it takes to get the contamination out… ‘It’ll be years.’ But that contaminated water…could lead to more sinkholes. The water is acidic…and laced with sulfate...As it sank into the ground, so did an unknown amount of gypsum, a fertilizer byproduct with low levels of radiation. That acid can eat through the limestone that’s beneath the surface of the ground…which could create more sinkholes in the vicinity…Scott ordered DEP Secretary Jon Steverson to change the rules so that any company or local government that dumps pollution anywhere in the state has to notify the public via the news media within 24 hours. DEP itself, however, would have no obligation to notify the public.” Read Mosaic official says Mulberry sinkhole could be much deeper than first reported

Matthew Peddie reports for WMFE – “Amendment 1, which was passed in 2014, set aside money for land acquisition, but the money hasn’t been spent the way environmentalists wanted. ‘Unfortunately, since 2009 there has been a virtual shutdown of acquisitions while the need grows,’ said Graham.” Read Intersection: Bob Graham Talks Water & Environment Challenges

Tory Perfetti, Pamela Goodman, and Stephen Smith write for the Tallahassee Democrat – “We urge Floridians to vote no on Amendment 1 for three reasons: 1. It’s funded by Florida’s big utilities to protect their monopolies and limit customer-owned solar. 2. It paves the way for barriers that would penalize solar customers. 3. It misleads Florida voters by promising rights and protections that Florida citizens already have.” Read Solar amendment misleading, harmful to consumers

Jennifer Logue reports for the Ponte Vedra Recorder – “A Gate Petroleum subsidiary has filed a lawsuit against St. Johns County, asking the court to force the county to act on its planned unit development (PUD) application for “Vista Tranquila,” a 77-home development it wants to build on the Outpost property. In the lawsuit, the Ponte Vedra Corporation (PVC) charges that county officials have failed to act for more than three years on its request for a routine administrative interpretation regarding the limits of the Conservation designation of the 99-acre property, which is located at the end of Neck Road and adjacent to the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve…In response to the proposed…development, local residents have organized a group called “Save Guana Now.”” Read Gate subsidiary sues county to act on Outpost development application

Frank Cerabino writes for my Palm Beach Post – “Donald Trump has said he would get rid of the Environmental Protection Agency…Environmental protection isn’t killing business in Florida. Business in Florida is killing Florida’s environment…[F]ore nearly 20 years, state lawmakers have sided with agricultural polluters around the lake by resisting the EPA’s efforts to establish specific nutrient contamination limits on the water. And this year, the state legislature passed an industry-friendly water bill that eases the timeliness for cleaning up the lake’s water…I’ll bet those people who live near the Mosaic sinkhole and rely on drinking water from the wells don’t think that the EPA’s lawsuit over the handling of hazardous waste at the plant is too much regulation…Will Florida be ‘fine with the environment’ without the EPA? Not as long as state leaders demonstrate that their primary interest is in protecting the polluters.” Read Too much regulation? Ask algae bloom, sinkhole neighbors

The Associated Press reports – “India’s prime minister said…that his country will ratify the Paris Agreement on climate change early next month. Prime Minister Narendra Modi said his government will ratify the agreement Oct. 2, coinciding with the birth anniversary of India’s independence leader Mohandas Gandhi, who believed in a minimum carbon footprint…India accounts for around 4.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said this month that 60 countries accounting for about 48 percent of emissions had already joined the agreement.” Read India to Ratify Paris Agreement on Climate Change

Carlos E. Medina reports for the Ocala Star Banner – “As summer turns into fall, Florida black bears start to fatten up as they prepare for the leaner winter months. That drive to pack on the pounds can make them bolder and more prone to explore larger areas in search of the added calories. ‘…An increased number of bears looking for food in areas where people live and work can potentially lead to more conflicts,’ said Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission…Mike Orlando, assistant bear program coordinator for the FWC…said the biggest causes of bear conflicts come from unsecured garbage…In lieu of a bear-resistant trash can, residents should keep trash in a secure location…until…pickup. Dog food, animal feed and even bird seed are other items that should be brought inside or be secured.” Read FWC urges care as bears become bolder in search of food

Zac Anderson reports for The Ledger – “[Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam] who helped drive water policy legislation that some environmental advocates think did not go far enough to address clean water issues said…that the bill is ‘a significant piece of legislation that we need to build on.’…While the comprehensive water policy legislation that passed the Legislature this year was supported by most Democrats and a number of environmental groups, including Audubon Florida, some environmental advocates thought it was too deferential to agriculture and big business…Paying for new water projects- including clean-up efforts such as storing polluted Lake Okeechobee water, helping neighborhoods move from septic tanks to central sewer…could be difficult next year. Incoming Senate President Joe Negron…has said he will champion new water quality projects, but a recent state budget forecast estimated next year’s surplus at just $7.5 million.” Read Putnam: Water policy ‘a significant piece of legislation that we need to build on’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

September – November – Participate in The Great Suwannee River Basin Cleanup 2016. For more information and to sign up, click here.

September 30th- October 2nd – Attend the 2016 Florida Springs Restoration Summit. The deadline to submit posters is approaching and registration will open in July. The Summit will take place at the College of Central Florida in Ocala. For more information about the Summit and registration details, click here.

October 5-6 – Attend the 8th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in West Palm Beach. For more information, click here.

October 20-21 – Attend Green Trends 2016 in Hollywood. The conference brings together Florida’s green building industry to tackle how Florida’s built environment can achieve sustainability. For more information, click here.

November 2-4 – Attend Florida’s inaugural class to train WERS verifiers in Maitland. The Water Efficiency Rating Score (WERS) is a new tool in the field of residential assessment for water conservation. For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

FCC News Brief - September 27, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 1 day ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

September 27, 2016




Bob Graham and Ryan Smart write for the Florida Times Union – “For those of us who call Florida home, our natural areas are not only our heritage but the foremost legacy that we will leave to our children and grandchildren…Today, however, funding for land conservation has slowed to a trickle at the same time that Florida is losing natural and working lands at an alarming rate. Florida 2070, a new report by 1000 Friends of Florida,…shows that the…projected increase in population can be accommodated…while permanently protecting nearly half of Florida from development…[T]he Northeast Florida Timberland and Watershed Reserve Florida Forever project…stretches from the Etoniah Creek State Forest…to the Nassau River north of Jacksonville. Acquisition of the remaining 83,000 acres of this project will preserve habitat for keystone species like the Florida black bear and gopher tortoise…and protect and restore land, water and wetland ecosystems. Northeast Florida’s legislators should make the protection of these lands a top priority for the 2017 legislative session.” Read Celebrate Florida’s natural wonders

Gladys Delgadillo writes for the League of Women Voters of Florida Blog – “Florida water crisis news stories flood our media outlets…We are in the midst of the 6th mass extinction event in the world’s history…Climate change is predicted to bring more frequent and intense weather events, sea level rise, and rising temperatures…Our last special places…are being polluted and bulldozed over each day. We can protect our quality of life- the reason so many tourists flock to our state annually- by preserving open spaces…Now is the time to look to the future and join together in our calls to return Florida Forever funding to historic levels.” Read We Need You to Speak Up for Florida Forever

Mary Ellen Klas reports for the Miami Herald – “Opponents hoping to overturn a controversial rule to allow higher concentrations of toxic chemicals into Florida’s water were dealt a setback…when an administrative law judge dismissed a series of complaints because they missed the deadline for filing the challenge. The groups, which included the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the City of Miami, Martin County and the Florida Pulp and Paper Association, must now decide if they will challenge the ruling at the District Court of Appeal…At a meeting of the Martin County Commission…commissioners voted unanimously to hire Florida International University toxicologist Gary Rand to determine the impact the increased concentration of more than 70 chemicals will have on the county’s fragile estuaries…But the commissioners also warned there will ‘be a cost’ to their litigation, saying that officials at the Department of Environmental Protection have warned them that if they continue to sue they will lose access to grants the county had hoped to receive to address its water-quality problems, including money for septic tank improvements and coral reefs…The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy has filed a Clean Water Act challenge against Florida Power & Light for the chemical discharges in its cooling canals at the Turkey Point nuclear plant…[They are] urging Miami-Dade and Monroe counties to consider intervening in the appeal process with Marin County and the City of Miami because ‘many of the chemical constituents found in the cooling canal system are proposed to be relaxed’ under the rule.” Read Judge won’t halt rule to allow increased toxins in Florida water

Craig Pittman reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “For three weeks, Florida Department of Environmental Protection officials kept mum about a phosphate mine’s 300-foot-deep sinkhole that dumped 215 million gallons of contaminated water into the state’s aquifer…Now Gov. Rick Scott has changed what’s required. Effective immediately, Scott…wants DEP to come up with a new rule requiring the owner or operate of any facility – including a city or county government – ‘to provide notification of incidents of pollution within 24 hours to DEP, local governments and the general public through the media.’ Scott said he was taking this step because of the delay in reporting the sinkhole incident to neighbors of the Mosaic plant in Mulberry and the delay in St. Petersburg officials reporting the tens of millions of gallons of sewage that the city’s aging wastewater system released into Tama Bay after Hurricane Hermine…The governor said he will also propose legislation next year to turn that requirement into state law.” Read After 3-week delay telling public about contaminated sinkhole, Gov. Rick Scott wants faster notice

Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “As incoming Senate budget chairman, GOP Sen. Jack Latvala says he will carry Sen. Joe Negron’s proposal for an Everglades…reservoir ‘to the finish line’ in 2017, but he also says the chamber will consider a range of options…Latvala said they talked about a ‘multifaceted program’ that includes support for Gov. Rick Scott’s proposal to connect homes on septic tanks to sewer systems.” Read Latvala: ‘Wide range of options on Everglades to be considered

Public News Service reports – “Research shows Florida’s industrial sector could save big and create jobs by making energy-efficiency upgrades, especially with the state’s untapped solar potential…[I]ndustrial energy-efficiency upgrades could save manufacturers close to $300 billion on utility bills, while cutting as much carbon dioxide as closing 46 coal-fired power plants…Right now, the fate of the Clean Power Plan is in the hands of the U.S. District Court of Appeals, which today begins oral arguments on the legal challenge to the plan.” Read Reports Find Big Savings for Industrial Energy-Efficiency Upgrades

Ryan Benk reports for WJCT – “St. Petersburg is facing scrutiny over its recent decision to pump 20 million gallons of sewage from an overloaded treatment plant into Tampa Bay. One national environmental organization is warning: similar overflows could become more common as the climate changes.” Read National Climate Group Warns More Florida Storm-Related Sewage Overflows to Come

Fred Hiers reports for the Daily Commercial – “Silver Springs State Park…continues to be the subject of disagreement concerning what the visitor experience should include. Park manager Sally Lieb and environmentalists envision a passive outdoor place where wildlife thrives and people quietly connect with nature…But even as Lieb protects the…property she knows she must address the demands of those who want the park open to swimming, active recreation and large-scale entertainment that would attract thousands of people at a time…Some local elected officials think the park is underutilized and overprotected.” Read Silver Springs State Park is at a crossroads

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

September – November – Participate in The Great Suwannee River Basin Cleanup 2016. For more information and to sign up, click here.

September 27, 6:30 pm – Attend Solar: Unlimited Energy for the Sunshine State. Discover why solar energy is important and how it impacts health, climate change, jobs, and your wallet. Presenters from the Suwannee-St. Johns Group of the Sierra Club will give examples of solar installations, cost-benefits, returns on investments, and the possible impacts of upcoming legislation. The event will be held at Gruff’s Tap and Grill (12084 S Williams St) in Dunnellon.

September 30th- October 2nd – Attend the 2016 Florida Springs Restoration Summit. The deadline to submit posters is approaching and registration will open in July. The Summit will take place at the College of Central Florida in Ocala. For more information about the Summit and registration details, click here.

October 5-6 – Attend the 8th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in West Palm Beach. For more information, click here.

October 20-21 – Attend Green Trends 2016 in Hollywood. The conference brings together Florida’s green building industry to tackle how Florida’s built environment can achieve sustainability. For more information, click here.

November 2-4 – Attend Florida’s inaugural class to train WERS verifiers in Maitland. The Water Efficiency Rating Score (WERS) is a new tool in the field of residential assessment for water conservation. For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

FCC News Brief - September 16, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo on September 16th

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

September 16, 2016




Andy Reid reports for the Sun Sentinel
– “Development at the current pace could gobble up too much of Florida’s farmland and natural areas over the next half century, according to a report…Suburbia threatens to cover nearly double the amount of land now claimed by neighborhoods and shopping centers, according to the Florida 2070 report. The study calls for allowing more intense development within or near already urbanized areas and also setting aside more land, through government land buys or other measures, to be preserved for farming and conservation…The idea behind the report is to show elected leaders and other policymakers how the decisions they make on new building plans have a serious, cumulative impact, according to 1000 Friends (of Florida). The results of the report show that ‘what may seem like small conservation and development decisions we make today have significant, long-term ramifications,’ said Young, of 1000 Friends.” Read Florida’s building boom should put more homes on less land, study says

Jim Waymer reports for Florida Today – “Would you still live in Florida if the population was 33.7 million, up from about 20 million today, and a third of the state’s land was covered with rooftops, roads and other development?...Houses, businesses and roads will swallow up several million acres of farms and habitats, unless development densities are increased, the study found. And that could mean costlier roads, drinking water, drainage and sewer systems. But even modest increases in development densities could save huge swaths of land and money, the study found, without sacrificing jobs. ‘I’d say the most critical message is that sprawl is wasteful,’ said Peggy Carr, a professor at UF’s GeoPlan Center, who worked on the analysis. ‘Land is finite.’…[The study] used…GIS…to examine two scenarios for 2070, comparing them to 2010. The first scenario continues current patterns...[The] alternative scenario accommodates the same population growth but increases development density in each county by 20 percent to save more farmlands, wetlands and wildlife. It also adds lands on the proposed Florida Forever Acquisition lists and lands identified as Priorities 1 and 2 in the Florida Ecological Greenways Network…The 1000 Friends report calls for more funding for greenways and wildlife corridors…” Read Study: A third of Florida will be covered in development by 2070

Zach Murdock reports for the Herald Tribune – “The Florida 2070 report…[examines] the state’s development trends and possible effects decades from now. The report finds the central region of the state- stretching from Sarasota County to Orlando- is likely to see the greatest increase in development during that time…In nearly every way, the study and its conclusions mirror the growing unease about development in Sarasota County that has come to permeate nearly every political discussion at every level in the area. Earlier this month, development and population growth were named the biggest issue facing Sarasota County for the third year in a row…It is already a primary election issue of the lone race for the County Commission and is expected to be pivotal in the spring Sarasota municipal election…[Current trends] can be mitigated by promoting infill and redevelopment…and by promoting conservation purchases…” Read Florida in 2070: Sprawling growth and booming population

Public News Service reports – “Florida Republicans, Democrats, Green Party supporters and many others have found something on which they all agree- their opposition to Amendment 1…[C]ritics argue it is deceptive and would allow utilities to penalize solar customers by doing away with net metering. Pamela Goodman, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, says both the wording and timing are confusing, as voters just last month overwhelmingly approved Amendment 4, providing tax breaks to people who install solar panels on their homes. ‘We urge voters to get the facts and not be fooled by this attempt to reverse…the will of their vote for solar expansion,’ she states. The pro-Amendment 1 campaign has raised close to $20 million, much of it from the state’s utilities, including Duke Energy, Florida Power and Light, Gulf Power and Tampa Electric Company.” Read Groups Say Solar Amendment Would Block the Sun

Jerome R. Stockfisch reports for the Tampa Bay Times – “Phosphate provides an element indispensable for the large-scale food production that keeps the world’s 7 billion people from starving. For more than a century, U.S. production has centered almost exclusively in one area: 2,000 square miles southeast of Tampa. Today, after a wholesale shakeout of the phosphate production industry, multiple environmental crises and doomsday predictions that the resource would be soon exhausted, the largest integrated phosphate producer in the world and the last one standing in Florida’s “Bone Valley” is expanding…Mosaic goes before Manatee County Commission…seeking a…expansion of its existing…Wingate mine. The permitting process for a…expansion of the…South Pasture mine in Hardee County is also under way. The company is also planning two new mines: Ona…in Hardee; and DeSoto…in the county of the same name. When mining does start, it won’t be pretty. Enormous…earth-moving machines…remove a 10- to 50-foot layer of soil…What remains is a wasteland…Two dozen mounds of phosphogypsum, the slightly radioactive byproduct of fertilizer manufacturing, rise over Central Florida. Some of the mounds tower 200 feet and cover 500 acres. In a century, no one has figured out a viable use for the product…[T]he government began requiring mining companies to reclaim the hacked-up moonscapes they left behind when phosphate ore is mined out…Mining opponents say that in reality, there’s no way to restore mines to their pre-mining state…Mosaic’s efforts to return mined land to productive uses or natural landscapes go beyond federal, state and local regulations, said spokeswoman Jackie Barron.” Read Digging in: Phosphate producer Mosaic is in it for the long haul

Jess Swanson reports for Broward Palm Beach New Times – “[E]nvironmentalists…fear runoff from [Waste Management Inc.’s] Monarch Hill Landfill near Coconut Creek in unincorporated Broward County will pollute drinking water with toxins… ‘Garbage juice,’ or leachate, is the runoff that pools around a landfill. It can contain high salinity, chemicals, heavy metals, and radioactive materials. For years, Waste Management has sent its leachate from Monarch Hill…to the county’s deep injection well about a mile away. Now the company has applied for a permit to dispose of the waste water with its own deep-water injection well…More than a hundred (Broward residents) showed up in opposition to the plan…They worry not just about the hazards to the drinking water but also contend the permit would allow other agencies to truck in thousands of gallons of waste water…There are currently 35 other deep-injection wells in Broward County. They’re operated by the county or cities. Waste Management currently operates two similar deep injection wells in Miami and Okeechobee.” Read Deep-Water Injection Well in Coconut Creek Will Pollute Drinking Water, Residents Say

Jim Waymer reports for Florida Today – “Lawyers for the Seminole Tribe, Martin County, the city of Miami and the pulp and paper industry told an administrative law judge…that Florida rushed through new, very complex criteria for more than 80 water toxins without properly notifying the public…In response to DEP’s motion to dismiss the case…arguments focused on who filed what, when and how, whether DEP properly notified the public…and whether petitioners met various deadlines for challenging the rule…[A]rguments did not address the substance of the new water toxin criteria, but whether the case should move forward…The deadline to petition for an administrative hearing on the new water toxin rule was…Aug. 5, DEP says, 10 days after the Environmental Regulation Commission passed the rule…The Seminole Tribe filed its petition Aug. 8, with the city of Miami and others joining later. But the tribe argues that DEP filed a ‘notice of change/withdraw’…on Aug. 4 that made significant changes to the rule, which should have extended the deadline.” Read Petitioners state case on new Florida water toxins rule

Palm Beach Post Editorial Board writes – “The agency charged with environmental restoration, water supply and flood protection in 16 counties is taking a jarringly adversarial tone that smacks of a political war room…When Eric Draper, Audubon’s executive director, urged the water management district board…to dip into its own funds, even if it meant abandoning a planned rollback of the property tax millage rate, the agency responded with a full-throated email blast: ‘Audubon wants to raise your taxes to pay for the federal government’s failure to control invasive plants…’ Oh, please. Holding taxes at the same rate is not the same as raising taxes. And the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which manages the state-owned refuge, is not primarily responsible for a condition that is overtaking the tree islands; no more than a tenant is responsible for fixing the apartment building roof after a hurricane….” Read Water district wields heavy hand against Audubon

 

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 


Petitions

Now or Neverglades Declaration

Ask the SFWMD to deny the permit for the Crosstown Parkway that cuts through TWO State Preserves

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

Help Florida Become a “Pay for Shade” state




Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

September – November – Participate in The Great Suwannee River Basin Cleanup 2016. For more information and to sign up, click here.

September 9-18 – Attend The Real Truth About Health Conference in Orlando. The conference looks at food, health, and the environmental impact of what we eat. For more information, click here.

September 17, 10:00 am – Attend a Celebration of Coastal Dune Lakes at the boat launch parking lot of Grayton Beach State Park. This will be a day of celebration, education, and activities along the Western Lake. The event is free with park admission. For more information, contact Marilue Maris at LocalOn30a@gmail.com

September 17, 11:00 am – Attend Solar: Unlimited Energy for the Sunshine State. Discover why solar energy is important and how it impacts health, climate change, jobs, and your wallet. Presenters from the Suwannee-St. Johns Group of the Sierra Club will give examples of solar installations, cost-benefits, returns on investments, and the possible impacts of upcoming legislation. The event will be held in the Dunnellon Public Library in Dunnellon.

September 21, 12:00 pm – Listen to 1000 Friends of Florida’s free webinar on alternative development scenarios for Florida in 2070. Moderate projections indicate that by 2070, Florida’s population will reach approximately 33.7 million residents, close to 15 million more people than in 2010. For more information and to register, click here.

September 23, 10:00 am – Attend the ShORE (Sharing Our Research with Everyone) Indian River Lagoon Symposium at the Brannon Center in New Smyrna Beach. Undergraduate research students and professional scientists will present their most recent findings on the lagoon. Speakers include Dr. George Burgess, international shark research expert from UF; Dr. Brian LaPointe, marine research scientist with HarborBranch; and Duane DeFreese, Executive Director of the Indian River Lagoon Council. For more information and to register, click here.

September 23 & 24 – Attend the Florida Wildflower Symposium at Silver Springs State Park in Ocala. The eighth annual symposium will offer field trips to local natural areas, workshops and walks, and educational presentations by experts on planting and growing native wildflowers, creating habitat for pollinators, and much more. For more information, click here.

September 24, 10:00 am  Join former U.S. Senator Bob Graham and Florida’s conservation community at “Speak up for Florida Forever,” a call to action to preserve and protect Florida’s natural lands and working landscapes. This free family-friendly event will take place at Camp Milton Historic Preserve (1225 Halsema Rd. N. Jacksonville, FL 32220) and features prominent speakers, live music, guided tours of Camp Milton’s biodiverse nature trails and boardwalk, family activities, and dozens of exhibitors. In addition to learning about the importance of preserving natural lands, guests will also be able to enjoy a glimpse into life during the Civil War with presentations by historical period reenactors and Civil War artillery demonstrations. For more information, click here.

September 27, 6:30 pm – Attend Solar: Unlimited Energy for the Sunshine State. Discover why solar energy is important and how it impacts health, climate change, jobs, and your wallet. Presenters from the Suwannee-St. Johns Group of the Sierra Club will give examples of solar installations, cost-benefits, returns on investments, and the possible impacts of upcoming legislation. The event will be held at Gruff’s Tap and Grill (12084 S Williams St) in Dunnellon.

September 30th- October 2nd – Attend the 2016 Florida Springs Restoration Summit. The deadline to submit posters is approaching and registration will open in July. The Summit will take place at the College of Central Florida in Ocala. For more information about the Summit and registration details, click here.

October 5-6 – Attend the 8th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in West Palm Beach. For more information, click here.

October 20-21 – Attend Green Trends 2016 in Hollywood. The conference brings together Florida’s green building industry to tackle how Florida’s built environment can achieve sustainability. For more information, click here.

November 2-4 – Attend Florida’s inaugural class to train WERS verifiers in Maitland. The Water Efficiency Rating Score (WERS) is a new tool in the field of residential assessment for water conservation. For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www . floridaconservationcoalition . org

Speak Up for Florida Forever

By Gladys Delgadillo on September 15th

Speak Up for Florida Forever

Saturday, September 24th, 2016 at 10am - 4pm

Location: Camp Milton Historic Preserve, 1225 Helsema Rd. N. Jacksonville, FL 32220

Florida Blue presents Speak Up for Florida Forever.

Preserving environmentally significant lands naturally helps to clean our waters, recharge our aquifers, provide wildlife habitat and enhance our quality of life. We must fund Florida Forever or risk losing Florida’s remaining natural places and the ecosystem services they provide.

Join former U.S. Senator Bob Graham and Florida’s conservation community at “Speak up for Florida Forever,” a call to action to preserve and protect Florida’s natural lands and working landscapes. This free family-friendly event will take place at Camp Milton Historic Preserve and features prominent speakerslive musicguided tours of Camp Milton’s biodiverse nature trails and boardwalk, hands-on educational programs for children and familiesfood trucks, and environmental exhibitors. In addition to learning about the importance of preserving natural lands, guests will also be able to enjoy a glimpse into life during the Civil War with presentations by historical period reenactors andCivil War Artilery Demonstrations (Cannon!).

Parking is available at Camp Milton, however we encourage you to ride your bike to the event on the beautiful Jacksonville-Baldwin Trail. 

This event is being brought to you by the Florida Conservation Coalition in partnership with 1000 Friends of Florida, North Florida Land Trust, Timucuan Parks Foundation, St Johns Riverkeeper, Defenders of Wildlife, and Florida Wildlife Corridor. Florida Blue has generously agreed to help sponsor this community event.

Please email any questions to Gladys at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com

Charter Members

FOUNDER and CHAIRMAN
Bob Graham, Former Governor of Florida and U.S. Senator

VICE CHAIRMEN
Nathaniel  Pryor Reed, Former Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Former Chairman SFWMD, Founder and Chairman Emeritus 1000 Friends of Florida 
And
Com. Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commissioner and Former State Senator, State Representative and Mayor of Altamonte Springs

AUDUBON FLORIDA

Eric Draper, Executive Director

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
Rob Moher, President
Jennifer Hecker, 
Director of Natural Resource Policy

FLORIDA WILDLIFE FEDERATION
Manley Fuller, President
Martha Musgrove, Board Member
Preston Robertson, General Counsel and VP for Conservation

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
Pam Goodman, President

1000 FRIENDS OF FLORIDA

Victoria Tschinkel
, Board Member and former Secretary of Department of Environmental Regulation
Ryan Smart, President

Charles Pattison, Policy Director 
Roy Rogers, Board Member

SIERRA CLUB
Craig Diamond
Frank Jackalone, Senior Organizing Manager

ST. JOHNS RIVERKEEPER
Lisa Rinaman, Riverkeeper
Jimmy Orth
, Executive Director

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
John Robert Middlemas, Chair
Janet Bowman, Director of Legislative Policy and Strategy

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Greg Chelius, Florida State Director
Will Abberger, Director Conservation Finance

INDIVIDUALS
Lester Abberger 
John Finlayson, Agriculturist, Jefferson County, former Chairman SRWMD
Bill Kerr, Environmental Consultant, Brevard County, former Chairman SJRWMD
Gary Kuhl, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD 
Jay Landers, Former Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, Former Director of the Department of Natural Resources

Allan Milledge, Former Chairman ELMs Committee and SFWMD
Auley Rowell, Agriculturist, Taylor County, former Chairman of SRWMD 
Earl Starnes, Former Dade County Commissioner, Former Director of the Division of State Planning
Sonny Vergara, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD and SJRWMD
Estus Whitfield, Former Principal Environmental Advisor to 5 Florida Governors

Mailing Address


Florida Conservation Coalition

Powered by GroupSpaces · Terms · Privacy Policy · Cookie Use · Create Your Own Group