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FCC News Brief - May 3, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 2 hours ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

May 3, 2016

 

Sierra Club Florida shares – “Sierra Club Florida submitted comments to the US Fish and Wildlife Service expressing strong opposition to the proposed Eastern Collier Habitat Conservation Plan…Our letter to the Service follows:… ‘There should be no land use intensification in the Primary Zone…Based on the known population density, the Primary Zone can support 71 to 84 panthers, which is barely within the minimum recommended base population of 80 to 100 necessary for persistence in south Florida. Therefore, the maintenance of existing home ranges and habitat conditions within the Primary Zone is essential to the survival of the Florida panther.” Read Sierra Club Opposes Plan to Develop 45,000 Acres of Panther Habitat

Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “This April will go down as the bloodiest month yet for the Florida panther…[N]ine of the endangered cats have died, all but one killed along Southwest Florida highways and roads. Seven were males, almost all of them at the young age when they start looking to establish their own territory…20 panthers have died this year, a number on track to outpace last year’s record-breaking 41 fatalities…The number…speaks to the increasing pressure from development on the wide-ranging panthers, particularly males, which each need a territory of about 200 square miles… ‘It’s death by a thousand cuts where this is not sustainable in the long term in our view unless we modify where and how we develop,’ said Jennifer Hecker, director of natural resource policy for the Conservancy of Southwest Florida…[W]hile some highways can be fenced, building neighborhoods is another story. Golden Gate Estates, a 100,000-acre-plus neighborhood of mixed residential and rural development in prime panther territory, remain a problem, said Elizabeth Fleming, a senior Florida representative for Defenders of Wildlife. ‘It’s a shame that was built because it’s just sprawl and there is still green habitat in there, but it’s not a safe place for panthers to be moving around,’ she said.” Read Deadliest month ever for Florida panthers, with nine killed

Chris Mooney reports for the Washington Post – “[S]ince mid-2015, a massive 40,000-acre (seagrass) die off…recalls a prior die-off from 1987 through the early 1990s…Fourqurean (a marine scientist at FIU) and government Everglades experts fear they’re witnessing a serious environmental breakdown, one that gravely threatens one of North America’s most fragile and unusual wild places…Besides being home to majestic sea turtles, dolphins, and manatees, Florida Bay also hosts pink shrimp, spiny lobsters, spotted seatrout, and much more- sport fishing alone here is worth $1.2 billion per year, according to the Everglades Foundation. And although there is at least some scientific dissent, Fourqurean and fellow scientists think they know the cause of the die-off. It’s just the latest manifestation, they say, of the core problem that has bedeviled this system for many decades: Construction of homes, roads, and cities has choked off the flow of fresh water. Without fast moves to make the park far more resilient to climate change and rising, salty seas, the problem will steadily worsen… ‘It’s basically a permanent manmade drought, created by the drainage and development patterns to the north in the Everglades,’ said Robert Johnson, director of the National Park Service’s South Florida Natural Resources Center…‘You have this water that’s…gin clear water, because the seagrasses and the biology kept the light penetrating, and then all of a sudden it changes pretty dramatically to a system without grass, and very turbid waters,’ Boesch said…‘The really disturbing thing is, this unprecedented event has now happened twice in my career,’ Fourgurean said.” Read This massive seagrass die-off is the latest sign we’re failing to protect the Everglades

The News-Press Editorial Board writes – “The truth, when it comes to Florida’s centuries old problem of chewing into the environment, draining the Everglades, killing off sea grass, oyster beds, other marine life, converting wetlands into uplands for development, is difficult to find. What isn’t murky…[is that] we must keep moving forward to a natural flow way to the Everglades. It will take land acquisition, massive re-engineering efforts of an effective water route that incorporates canals, land and a filtering system.” Read Finding the truth in murky water

Dan Sweeney reports for the Sun Sentinel – “Nearly $1 billion could be headed from Washington to the Everglades under a bill approved by a U.S. Senate panel…Neither senator from Florida is on the committee, but both supported the projects…Sen. Jim Inhofe, the chairman of the Senate’s environment committee, is a climate change denier who takes a dim view of large-scale projects such as Everglades restoration. The Oklahoma Republican was the only senator to vote against the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan when it passed the Senate in 2000. But according to Inhofe, Rubio persuaded him to include the Florida projects in the bill…The bill will still need to be approved in the full U.S. Senate and paired with similar legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives before going to President Barack Obama to be signed into law. With support from Everglades restoration’s biggest critic in the Senate, the chances of passage are good.” Read U.S. Senate panel approves Everglades funding

Bruce Ritchie reports for Politico Florida – “At its Turkey Point nuclear plant…Florida Power & Light Co. has proposed two nuclear units to match two built in the early 1970s. The state has approved the plans. But the site has come under scrutiny…Now, environmental groups, the Environmental Protection Agency and the city of Miami are using the federal process to raise anew questions about the suitability of the site…[T]he 3rd District Court of Appeal sent the  case back to the Cabinet…” Read Turkey Point canal problems prompt scrutiny of plans for new reactors

Sue Sturgis reports for Facing South – “Though the Obama administration dropped the Atlantic Ocean from the upcoming five-year plan for offshore drilling earlier this year, plans for seismic testing to map undersea oil and gas reserves are still in place for an area within three miles of the coastline from Delaware to Florida, as none of the companies that have sought seismic permits from the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management have withdrawn their applications…The federal government has acknowledged that seismic blasting in the Atlantic could injure as many as 138,000 dolphins and whales and disturb millions more animals. Now a group of U.S. senators (led by Sen. Cory Booker) has introduced a bill that would put the Atlantic off limits for seismic tests…Booker’s bill has been referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, which is chaired by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). The oil and gas industry is the top industrial contributor to Murkowski’s campaign.” Read The ongoing fight over seismic testing for Atlantic oil and gas deposits

Devin Henry reports for The Hill – “Two Senate Democrats have introduced a bill to create a new climate change adaptation fund to be paid for through new federal bonds…Boxer and Durbin compared the climate change bond program to the war bonds sold by the federal government during the World Wars. Boxer said the bonds would let Americans literally buy into federal climate change work…The fund would tap an expert committee- made up of bipartisan appointments- to vet projects designed to adapt to climate change…Local and state governments would be asked to kick in 25 percent of the cost of their projects in order to receive grants from the fund.” Read Senate Democrats push climate change bond bill

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

June 7, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs chemistry: General, nutrients, and trace contaminants. For more information, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - May 2, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 1 day ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

May 2, 2016

 

Bill Geringswald writes for the Orlando Sentinel – “It has been recognized that the Floridan aquifer supplies most of our drinking water. It is also recognized that the displacement of our green spaces by asphalt and concrete jeopardizes the process of recharging the aquifer…Conservation, smart land use (to include land banking) and product waste recycling will be the keys to protect our recharging areas from urban abuse. Plan and build and support green. And we must have the discipline to enact common-sense goals and the commitment to have this happen not just regionally, but statewide.” Read Conserve resources, recycle to protect water supply: My Word

Skyler Swisher reports for the Sun Sentinel – “A judge dismissed a lawsuit…that sought to block a massive new development for rural western Palm Beach County. Developers say the ruling removes the last obstacle for Minto Communities’ Westlake community…The Palm Beach County judge ruled the development approved by the County Commission in 2014 was consistent with the county’s growth plan. In a statement, John Carter, vice president of Mino communities, said… ‘We intend to pursue sanctions against all plaintiffs in this frivolous case,’…Robert Hartsell, who represented 1000 Friends of Florida…said the case ‘is very appealable.’…The ruling follows another court decision in March that dismissed other arguments against the project. Minto Communities is supporting an incorporation effort for the development.  Only five registered voters live in Seminole Improvement District, which was created to supply water to the 3,800-acre property.” Read Palm Beach County judge dismisses lawsuit seeking to block 4,500-home development

Steve Patterson reports for The Florida Times Union – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet approved a plan…to preserve about 5,200 acres of St. Johns County forest that has been farmed as commercial timber for the past century. The decision gave state officials permission to pay the owners about $6 million to sign away development rights on the land through a conservation easement. That would allow the land to still be worked while eliminating chances for construction on the property…The land…is part of a conservation project called the St. Johns River Blueway that has been championed by environmentalists, who cheered the easement. ‘This conservation easement protects Watson Island State Forest, contributes to the economy by providing 130 jobs, and protects land in the northwest corner of the fastest growing county in Florida,’ said Jim McCarthy, executive director of the North Florida Land Trust…” Read Governor, Cabinet OK deal to protect St. Johns timberland

Santa Rosa’s Press Gazette reports – “Adopting an ordinance mandating bear-proofing techniques in a county’s conflict zone could also mean state assistance. Goode (FWC biologist) said there has been $500,000 appropriated ‘but the kicker is, 60 percent of that money has to go to counties with ordinances.’ Right now, she said, Seminole is the only one in the top 14 to have an ordinance. ‘Seminole County instated their ordinance, and we haven’t set a trap there for a bear. They all moved…,’ Goode said. District 4 Commissioner Rob Williamson…said he would be in favor of an ordinance. Commission Chairman Lane Lynchard directed Attorney Roy Andrews to see how the Seminole County ordinance could be applied in Santa Rosa County.” Read Lock up trash to repel bears, Florida Fish and Wildlife rep says

Naples Daily News Editorial Board writes – “A welcome chorus of voices may be uniting to take the next logical step in determining the future of hydraulic fracturing in Florida – to hit the pause button and scientifically study the question…We’d see an academic Florida-specific study as preferable to one industry-driven, or led by environmental groups who already are on record with a position, or directed by a state agency that then would be responsible for independently regulating whatever the outcome is...Going forward, we hope to see a stripped-down effort to get money appropriated to get that academic study done..., suspending use of new drilling techniques while oil and gasoline prices are low and domestic production may not be as critical.” Read Voices seem to be uniting when it comes to a Florida study of fracking

Sun Sentinel Editorial Board writes – “Would Smart Solar be good policy? Should it be in the Constitution? Approval would require 60 percent of voters to say ‘yes.’ It is not at all clear that would be smart.” Read Be skeptical of ‘Smart Solar’ amendment

Fox 4 reports – “[A] one year old male panther was hit and killed by a car in Hendry County…19 panthers have now been killed this year in Florida. All but two deaths were by vehicle collisions.” Read 2nd Florida panther found dead Tuesday

Greg Bluestein reports for AJC – “[Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said]: ‘…We see all these people pontificating about what the governors ought to be doing (regarding the legal feud over water rights with Florida). Especially Sen. Rubio…He seems to forget that his governor, and his state, sued the state of Georgia in the U.S. Supreme Court. And that is an ongoing case and we’re under a gag order not to comment.’ Deal addd: ‘Maybe senators ought to have gag orders as well.’” Read Nathan Deal to Marco Rubio: ‘Maybe senators ought to have gag orders as well’

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - April 28, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 4 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 28, 2016

 

Jenny Staletovich reports for the Miami Herald – “In a notice to Florida Power & Light officials, the Department of Environmental Protection gave the utility 21 days to provide any information about how the 40-year-old canals have seeped into the Biscayne aquifer and enter negotiations to come up with a clean-up plan. If the two sides fail to agree on a fix, the agency may come up with its own measures in 60 days.” Read Florida cites FPL for Turkey Point cooling canal violations

Michael Sole writes for the Tallahassee Democrat – “For decades, FPL enjoyed a productive, cooperative relationship with its rock mining neighbor, Mr. Torcise and his company, Atlantic Civil Incorporated. Lately, however, Mr. Torcise has been anything but neighborly, rarely missing an opportunity to publicly attack FPL.” Read FPL addressing saltwater problems

Naples Daily News reports – “Florida tallied the year’s 16th roadkill endangered panther…bringing the 2016 death toll to more than half of last year’s record of 30 panthers…So far this year, FWC biologists have found 18 dead panthers overall, most of them in Collier and Lee counties.” Read Florida panther killed by vehicle on Interstate 75 in Estero

Jensen Werley reports for The Jacksonville Business Journal – “The St. Johns Riverkeeper is resubmitting its petition against dredging this week, following the Department of Environmental Protection requesting more details.” Read Jaxport, St. Johns Riverkeeper prepare for legal battle over dredging

The Ocala Star Banner Editorial Board writes – “Ever since Jerry Dodd purchased 279 acres on a mile-long stretch of the Rainbow River with plans to build hundreds of homes and a commercial center, the development’s fate has taken…twists and turns…Last week a state appeals court ruled that the comprehensive plan process that led to a settlement between the city of Dunnellon and Dodd that would have allowed the development to move forward was improper and must be done all over again…The construction of 300-plus homes and commercial businesses on the banks of the already stressed Rainbow River is just bad for the river…Yet, there may be a solution that could make all sides…satisfied. The Springs Restoration Council of the Southwest Florida Water Management District…has recommended the…district acquire the Rainbow River Ranch property…We applaud SWFWMD’s decision to try and buy Dodd’s 1.3 miles of riverfront property.” Read Twists and turns on the Rainbow

TC Palm Editorial Board writes – “House Resolution 4793 (the Everglades Land Acquisition Act) – would earmark $500 million for the U.S. Interior Department to purchase land south of Lake O…Moving water south from Lake O is the ultimate solution to the problem…Currently, there are no co-sponsors for the land-buying bill. Treasure Coast Newspapers’ Editorial Board urges the members of our federal legislative delegation – including Sens. Bill Nelson…and Marco Rubio…and Reps. Patrick Murphy…and Tom Rooney…to sign on and support this important legislation.” Read Federal lawmakers must step up, support land-buying bill to help end Lake O discharges

Stacie Greco writes for the Gainesville Sun – “Please collect leaves and use them around existing plants as mulch, add them to compost piles for future use, or place them in yard waste bags or reusable trash cans for curbside collection.” Read Leaves clog storm drains

Bill Ritter writes for The Wall Street Journal – “The truth is that despite the large-scale, global impact of climate change, it is the states and cities, not Washington D.C., that have most of the legal powers to prevent global warming by helping the United States transition to cleaner energy.” Read Why States and Cities Must Lead the Way on Climate Change

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP to Tracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free).

Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

If you wish to stop receiving these daily emails just reply with the subject "unsubscribe" and you will be promptly removed.

Please send all suggestions, comments and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition.org

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

FCC News Brief - April 27, 2016

By Gladys Delgadillo 5 days ago

FCC News Brief

Florida’s best environmental reporting, editorials, and op-eds

April 27, 2016

 

Dinah Voyles Pulver reports for The Daytona Beach News-Journal – “City leaders celebrated when the regional water management agency bought more than 900 acres…in 1999 to help protect Gemini Springs and DeBary Bayou….Now the city wants to acquire 102 acres of that land from the St. Johns River Water Management District to build a…regional stormwater pond surrounded by single and multi-family homes, the centerpiece of a larger project to attract and promote economic development around the SunRail station…To help win the district’s approval, the city has hired the Orlando consulting firm of John Miklos, who also happens to be chairman of the water district’s board…Mayor Clint Johnson said the city never would pay out that kind of money without assurances the deal would be approved by the district… ‘This is the worst case of transparency that I can recall in years,’ said former County Councilwoman Pay Northey, who was on the council when the county agreed to take over ownership of the land from the water district three years ago, with the stipulation that it remain in conservation. That hasn’t happened…Current and former county officials…question the use of public land to support development and the potential impacts to neighboring Gemini Springs, an environmental preserve with a pair of springs.” Read SunRail vs. Scenery: DeBary land deal draws fire

Thomas St. Myer reports for the Pensacola News Journal – “Kaitlin Goode, an FWC bear biologist…requested (Santa Rosa) commissioners consider an ordinance that requires citizens to secure their trash cans with retro fit clips or to wait until the morning of pick up to put their trash cans on the curb…Florida Legislature appropriated $500,000 to assist with bear management, with 60 percent of the dollars earmarked for Santa Rosa and 13 other counties with the highest bear population to pay for bear-resistant containers and so forth…The law requires the counties adopt an ordinance to be eligible for those funds. Seminole County already adopted an ordinance…Goode said research indicates the number of bears in the county would probably decrease after about three weeks, if the county commissioners put an ordinance in place and its citizens abide by the law.” Read Ordinance answer for bear reduction in Santa Rosa?

Edith M. Lederer and Cara Anna report for the Associated Press – “The historic agreement on climate change marked a…milestone…with a record 175 countries signing on to it on opening day…‘The world is in a race against time,’ U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in his opening speech. ‘The era of consumption without consequences is over.’…The agreement will enter into force once 55 countries representing at least 55 percent of global emissions have formally joined it, a process initially expected to take until 2020. China, the world’s top carbon emitter, announced it would ‘finalize domestic procedures’ to ratify the agreement before the G-20 summit in China in September. The United States, the world’s second-largest emitter, reiterated its intention to ratify this year, as did Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau…Leonardo Dicaprio, a U.N. messenger of peace and climate activist, captured the feelings of many when he said: ‘We can congratulate each other today, but it will mean absolutely nothing if the world’s leaders gathered here go home and do nothing…The world is now watching. You will either be lauded by future generations or vilified by them.’” Read 175 states sign landmark Paris deal on climate change

Mike Vasilinda reports for Capitol News Service – “The land and water conservation amendment on the 2014 ballot got more votes than any statewide elected official. It was a rebuke of lawmakers who slashed environment funding during the recession, then didn’t restore it when the economy improved…Florida Conservation Voters has created a web site detailing how all of the 900 million that’s supposed to go to land and water conservation is being spent this year. Included is the entire cost of fighting forest fires in Florida, the cost of enforcing boating regulations on the water. The conservation money is even paying all of the salaries of the people who run all of the agencies that have anything to do with conservation. That’s all cash that came from general revenue before.” Read Amendment One Funds Still Being Diverted

Tom Palmer writes for The Ledger – “Florida’s wild landscape contains more than 500 species of plants that are considered endangered, threatened or at risk from commercial exploitation…The bad news is that there’s nothing to stop a private landowner from bulldozing any rare or endangered plant in the way of his development plan. That’s because under the Endangered Species Act and other laws designed to preserve our natural heritage, endangered plants don’t receive the same level of protection as endangered animals. Protection under state law is limited, too.” Read Florida’s endangered plants struggle for protection

Jake Martin reports for The St. Augustine Record – “Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinent [was] asked to buy 5,236 acres of timber land in St. Johns County, to be used as a conservation easement…The land, part of the…St. Johns River Blueway Florida Forever tract, runs along the eastern shore of the St. Johns River…It is adjacent to the Watson Island State Forest…The land is ranked ninth on the state’s Florida Forever Climate Change Lands list…” Read State to consider $6M timber land purchase in St. Johns County

David Fleshler reports for the Sun Sentinel – “South Florida’s corals are turning white and contracting fatal diseases in what’s being called an unprecedented die-off across the region’s reefs. Off Hollywood, scientists witnessed the collapse of a minivan-sized coral colony that had started growing more than three centuries ago, when the Spanish ruled the peninsula. As recently as September, live coral tissue covered 90 percent of the colony’s surface, making it among the oldest living things in the state. By December it was almost completely dead…The bleaching and disease has struck around the world, with scientists blaming global warming, as well as unusual weather events…Last week scientists announced that 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia had been affected.” Read South Florida corals dying in ‘unprecedented’ bleaching and disease

Isadora Rangel reports for the TC Palm – “Two of the 12 people running to replace U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy accepted political contributions from the sugar industry, a controversial move in a congressional district that’s ground zero for Lake Okeechobee discharges. The donations represent a small portion of the total raised by Army veteran Brian Mast and sugar farmer Rick Roth, both Republicans…The troubled estuary is arguably the top local issue in the race for District 19, which covers Martin County – the most affected by discharges on Florida’s east coast- as well as St. Lucie and northern Palm Beach counties. Knowing whether a candidate has taken sugar money might not be a deal breaker, as their record on environmental issues also should be a factor, but ‘it matters,’ said environmentalist Maggy Hurchalla, a former Martin County commissioner and water advocate. Hurchalla said it also matters to know whether candidates support buying land…south of the lake to move its water into the Everglades.” Read Sugar sweetens campaigns of Brian Mast, Rick Roth in race to replace Patrick Murphy

 

 

From Our Readers

The information in this section is forwarded to you at the request of some of our readers. Inclusion in this section does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the FCC.

 



Job Postings

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking a staff or senior attorney – Southeast Endangered Species.

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Everglades Restoration Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Palm Beach County for their Stop Sugar Cane Field Burning Campaign

Sierra Club is seeking an Organizing Representative based in Gainesville for their Red Tide (Water Quality) Campaign


Petitions

Save the Econlockhatchee River!

Ask County Commissions to Pass Bear-Friendly Trash Ordinances

Stop the Port Canaveral Rail Extension Project

Ask the USACE to reject Harbor Sound application to fill wetlands

Paynes Prairie in danger

Save the Biggest Wetland Mitigation Bank in the U . S . A . from Development

Deny Beruff’s Mitigation Bank Permit

 

Making Connections

Gulf Restoration Network’s Johanna de Graffenreid wants to help citizens/environmental groups interested in opposing the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Contact her at johanna@healthygulf.org.

 

Upcoming Environmental Events

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend Friends of Lullwater Lake’s first meeting since registering officially as a non-profit organization. The meeting will take place in the grassy common area at Lullwater Condominiums (301 Lullwater Drive, Panama City Beach). Bring a lawn chair to sit on. Meet the board members and plan next steps.

April 30, 2:00 pm – Attend “Exploring Wild Florida,” a presentation by Doug Alderson (author and Blueways Pioneer), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

April 30, 4:00 pm – Attend Lost Springs Meet and Greet in Palatka and share your photos and experiences of the wonders made visible by the recent drawdown of the Ocklawaha River. Special presentations will be given by Matt Keene, Margaret Tolbert, and Mark Long. Please RSVP to Tracy@fladefenders.org or call (352) 475- 1119.

May 3, 12:00 pm – Attend Springs Academy Tuesdays at the North Florida Springs Environmental Center (99 NW 1st Avenue) in High Springs every first Tuesday of the month. There is a suggested donation of $5 per class to help support the efforts of Florida Springs Institute. This month’s class will be on springs hydrogeology: the Florida Aquifer, groundwater recharge, and springs flows. For more information, click here.

May 11, 12:00 pm – Listen to “Ethics in Leadership Development for the Planner,” a 1000 Friends of Florida webinar covering the ethics requirements of the American Institute of Certified planners and how these interface with Florida’s ethics laws. Emphasis will be placed on ethics as it relates to leadership and common ethics traps. For more information and to register, click here.

May 14, 2:00 pm – Attend “Long Leaf Pine- Restoring Fred George Basin’s ecosystem,” a presentation by Tom Ostertag (FWC Imperiled Species Biologist), at 2043 Capitol Circle NW, Tallahassee, FL. For more information, contact Michael Kelly at (229) 225- 6530.

May 19, 10:00 am -  Attend Tri-county Working Group of Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club’s Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now at Rainbow Springs State Park in Dunellon. It is an interactive, presenter-led PowerPoint program that translates scientific facts into common language, detailing the specific impact of Florida’s and especially the tri-county’s (Citrus-Levy-Marion) water problems on jobs, property values, lifestyles, ecotourism and most importantly, our drinking water. For more information contact Nancy Kost at (352) 628- 0698 or nkost@tampabay.rr.com.

May 19-22: Attend the Florida Native Plant Society’s 36th Annual Conference in Daytona Beach. The conference includes a variety of presentations and workshops on butterflies, bees and wildflowers, tree care, plants of the everglades, environmental education, invasive plants, rain gardens, landscape ecology, protection of water resources, and rare native plant conservation. Field trips include landscape tours, kayak trips, pontoon boat trips, eco-buggy excursions, truck-bed trips, and hikes. For more information and to register, click here, call (321) 271- 6702, or email info@fnps.org.

June 4, 10:00 am – Attend Coastal Dune Lake Day. Learn about the coastal Dune Lakes and experience Western Lake from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Paddle to clean up the Lake from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm. Clean up the park from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Meet at the Boat Launch Parking Lot at Grayton Beach State Park.

 

 

 

 

 

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About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 60 conservation organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.   

For more information on the FCC visit www.floridaconservationcoalition.org

Charter Members

FOUNDER and CHAIRMAN
Bob Graham, Former Governor of Florida and U.S. Senator

VICE CHAIRMEN
Nathaniel  Pryor Reed, Former Assistant Secretary of the Interior, Former Chairman SFWMD, Founder and Chairman Emeritus 1000 Friends of Florida 
And
Com. Lee Constantine, Seminole County Commissioner and Former State Senator, State Representative and Mayor of Altamonte Springs

AUDUBON FLORIDA

Eric Draper, Executive Director

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
Rob Moher, President
Jennifer Hecker, 
Director of Natural Resource Policy

FLORIDA WILDLIFE FEDERATION
Manley Fuller, President
Martha Musgrove, Board Member
Preston Robertson, General Counsel and VP for Conservation

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
Pam Goodman, President

1000 FRIENDS OF FLORIDA

Victoria Tschinkel
, Board Member and former Secretary of Department of Environmental Regulation
Ryan Smart, President

Charles Pattison, Policy Director 
Roy Rogers, Board Member

SIERRA CLUB
Craig Diamond
Frank Jackalone, Senior Organizing Manager

ST. JOHNS RIVERKEEPER
Lisa Rinaman, Riverkeeper
Jimmy Orth
, Executive Director

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
John Robert Middlemas, Chair
Janet Bowman, Director of Legislative Policy and Strategy

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND
Greg Chelius, Florida State Director
Will Abberger, Director Conservation Finance

INDIVIDUALS
Lester Abberger 
John Finlayson, Agriculturist, Jefferson County, former Chairman SRWMD
Bill Kerr, Environmental Consultant, Brevard County, former Chairman SJRWMD
Gary Kuhl, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD 
Jay Landers, Former Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, Former Director of the Department of Natural Resources

Allan Milledge, Former Chairman ELMs Committee and SFWMD
Auley Rowell, Agriculturist, Taylor County, former Chairman of SRWMD 
Earl Starnes, Former Dade County Commissioner, Former Director of the Division of State Planning
Sonny Vergara, Former Executive Director, SWFWMD and SJRWMD
Estus Whitfield, Former Principal Environmental Advisor to 5 Florida Governors

Mailing Address


Florida Conservation Coalition

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